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20130206
20130206
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
's revenue sharing, it is economic development for the areas, the communities and cities where we operate, so it's not just about baseball teams. we continue to do well. >> thank you so much for joining us. a great pleasure having you on. >> likewise. >> linda alvarado, alvarado construction. >>> a sneak peek in the green room, packed this morning. they regularly talk on conference calls with the white house, consulting with the president on issues of vital economic performance. today, they consult with you our viewer on "squawk box." at 1:45, the aflac duck was brought in with multiple lacerations to the wing and a fractured beak. surgery was successful, but he will be in a cast until it is fully healed, possibly several months. so, if the duck isn't able to work, how will he pay for his living expenses? aflac. like his rent and car payments? aflac. what about gas and groceries? aflac. cell phone? aflac, but i doubt he'll be using his phone for quite a while cause like i said, he has a fractured beak. [ male announcer ] send the aflac duck a get-well card at getwellduck.com. ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪
>>> well, "the economist" is out with its list of most expensive cities in the world based on the price of everyday items. at number five, we have melbourne, australia, my hometown where, unfortunately, a loaf of bread there will set you back an average of $4.84. oslo, norway, very expensive city, a pack of smokes governments 15 bucked and number three, sydney, a bottle of table wine will cost you $25 which is a disgrace considering how much wine we produce and the runner up osaka, japan, where a dinner for four costs you $950. world's most expensive city, tokyo, loaf of bread, $9.60. >> thanks for watching "street signs," everybody. >> "closing bell" is next. >> hi, everybody. we enter the final stretch. welcome to the "closing bell." i'm embroemo at the new york stock exchange. this market trying to finish and retake that 14,000 level, not so fast. >> we're coming back here. i'm bill griffith. a see-saw day so far, the market's february volatility does continue and setting up to be an interesting final hour of trade, this being the most important hour of the day. as we've
. and then the other half, 60, so you get an average. sonny in illinois. >> caller: a big booyah from the windy city. i love your show. long time fan. >> i appreciate it. >> caller: the company is huntsman, h u.n. >> go with georgia gulf. buy, buy, buy. go to john in florida. >> caller: jim, i would like your latest take on arena pharmaceutical. >> @jimcramer on twitter, because i didn't fall in love with this stock, a lot of people despise me. i know people are in love with it. i am not in love with it. be but let's go to carl in arkansas. >> caller: greetings from arkansas. i am thinking of picking up a bank stock, your thoughts of new york community bank. >> the yield is so much higher than all the others, i will send you to keen. i don't know, it is a nice gain. i prefer key. i like the safety. that, ladies and gentlemen, is the conclusion of the lightning round! >>> ina bull market, it is easier to pick stock that can go higher. this is what a bull market looks like. what is more lucrative is picking stocks that go higher. we have stocks like allergan, it makes real medicine, a leading player in t
. everything is an additional 50%, 60%. an expensive city. so we'll see. it sounds like if mark carney actually doesn't come out with some of the more dovish statements on thursday people are expecting, the other thing could happen. we could be backing up toward 1.60 again. we'll see. mark, i hope you're listening. i'm kidding. >> between 1.50, 1.65 is -- what the exchange rate should be for dollar/sterling. that band is the comfortable trade weighted. it's about right. >> okay. >> and now, hsbc taking a turn in the hot seat this morning, appearing before the parliamentary commission on banking standards. hsbc ceo stewart gulliver and chairman douglas flint giving answer as we speak. just to let you know that that's happening. and there's plenty of corporate news, as well, today. >> that's right. disney's first-quarter profits fell 6% in part because of rising costs to buy sports content for espn. the company is exploring an exit from espn in the u.k. excluding that, results beat forecasts as revenues rose 5%. disney does see better quarters ahead thanks to strong film slate and improving theme
from the 787 grounding. >> good morning, carl. four cities in the u.s. in particular are impacted by what's happening with the dreamliner. you see them over here. san jose, san diego, denver and houston. let's walk through and explain what's at stake for each of these cities. san jose had the dreamliner service started at one point. and the flight from san jose to tokyo, the economic impact, it's estimated to be about $214,000 a day to that region. now, that's just an estimate at this point. next when you talk about san diego, japan airlines beginning dreamliner service, or supposed to begin service to narita, and at this point, $750,000 in marketing support, along with reduced landing fees. the reason why? you want that direct flight over tokyo from san diego. denver, colorado, this is a big deal for united airlines. service was supposed to start at the end of march. at this point they say it's still going to happen. but look at the economic impact if this is delayed. it's estimated this service will bring in $132 million to the state of colorado. and then finally, united also pl
fine stay is creating a new category of city accommodations. combining cheap hotels with the best parts of staying in someone's real home. guests receive a distinctive home yet fitted without five star quality hotel linens, towels, toiletries and we give them an iphone loaded with local area information to use during their stay. the host receives something fully turn key. when they are out of town, we come into the home, clean, prepare it, welcome kbests on arrival. handle any issues that arise during guest stay and put the home back the way it was after the guest leaves and before they come back. we started this business in may in 2010 in london. we now work with over 500 homes there. i moved back to new york this past january to start one fine stay here. we add successful summer of trading. we work with 80 homes in new york. we are excited to grow in new york and beyond. >> evan is on the right side of your screen. he cannot react it criticism or compliments until i say so, which is how we like it. so, kate is founder of author of bold women big ideas. and leader of raising venture ca
, the megabanks, especially city and b of a have not performed well, even going back before the crisis, trading at significant discounts to tangible book value. so where the government could play a positive role is getting more information out to investors so they can decide maybe the economically best solution for this is a market-driven breakup, but right now it's very difficult again the inadequate disclosures to see how profitable each business line is because the mega banks don't allocate their capital expenses according to their business line. so i think the government has probably not looked at that as much as they should, and we need to get market information out. i think the market can provide a much faster solution than government, but you're right. they are still continuing interest in congress on some type of size limit or breakup proposal. >> i guess, isn't it difficult to see a different, you know, setup in europe than the u.s.? i mean, do we need a global standard? >> yeah. >> is it even logical to think that we have one standard across the world? >> well, i think that would be y
-clenching, teeth-rattling ride on an unpaved road from the capital city to the hospital. >> why do they call this a highway? >> you got me. you got me, buddy. it's the principle artery through central haiti. >> if the ride doesn't break your back, what you see when you arrive will break your heart. the squatter settlement of cange is one of the poorest parts of the poorest country in the western hemisphere. >> [speaking french] >> the desperate need paul farmer saw here as a young man inspired him and four friends to create partners in health. they raised money and built what's become the largest hospital in central haiti. >> [speaking french] >> how many lives do you think partners in health have saved? >> in medicine we say t.n.t.c.: too numerous to count. too numerous to count. >> what began as a small, understaffed, ill-equipped clinic in 1985 today has 100 inpatient beds, an array of specialists, and three operating rooms. they have nearly two million patients visits a year. >> [speaking french] >> and the medical care here is free. for paul farmer, health care is a human right. he want
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)